Our Region, Our Environment, Our Future.
State Government Victoria
The Regional Catchment Strategy for the Port Phillip & Western Port region

Interactive Map

  • + Native vegetation

  • + Native animals

  • + Waterways & wetlands

  • + Hinterland

  • + Coasts

  • + Port Phillip Bay and Western Port

  • + Groundwater

  • + Climate Change

    • Native vegetation sensitive to climate change

      Description:

      This layer depicts the native vegetation that was assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for its likely sensitivity to climate change (changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.  Sensitive vegetation is likely to be the first affected by climate change.

      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:
      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

    • Waterways/wetlands sensitive to climate

      Description:

      This layer depicts the sections of waterways and wetlands assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for their likely sensitivity to climate change (changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.


      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:
      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

    • Land/soils sensitive to climate change

      Description:

      This layer broadly depicts the areas of land/soils assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for their likely sensitivity to climate change (changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.

      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:
      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

    • Coasts sensitive to climate change

      This layer depicts the sections of coasts assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for their likely sensitivity to changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.

      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:

      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

      Further information regarding risk of inundation and flooding in coastal areas is available via the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website (go to the link for the Port Phillip Bay Coastal Adaptation Pathways project or Westernport Local Coastal Hazard Assessment).

    • Relative carbon sequestration potential

      Description:

      This layer broadly depicts areas of the region potentially suitable for revegetation at a scale that would be significant for carbon sequestration purposes (including consideration of current land use, original vegetation type, rainfall, soil type and current vegetation quality).  It generally excludes areas of public land, intensive agriculture and urban areas.

      The layer shows:


      Source:

      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning BioSim Carbon Sequestration assessment.

  • + Other information

  • ? Instructions

    Using this map:
    You can move and zoom the map, and change from ‘satellite’ to ‘map’ view.
    In the menu on the left-hand side, click the ‘plus’ symbols beside each heading to see layers of information to explore.  Click the boxes to turn on each layer.  Multiple layers can be used at once.  Recently-clicked layers will display on top in the map.
    Each layer holds data - click directly on a shape/line/point on the map to see the data.

Give feedback here