Our Region, Our Environment, Our Future.
State Government Victoria
The Regional Catchment Strategy for the Port Phillip & Western Port region

Interactive Map

  • + Native vegetation

  • + Native animals

  • + Waterways & wetlands

  • + Hinterland

  • + Coasts

  • + Port Phillip Bay and Western Port

  • + Groundwater

  • + Climate Change

    • Native vegetation sensitive to climate change

      Description:

      This layer depicts the native vegetation that was assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for its likely sensitivity to climate change (changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.  Sensitive vegetation is likely to be the first affected by climate change.

      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:
      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

    • Waterways/wetlands sensitive to climate

      Description:

      This layer depicts the sections of waterways and wetlands assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for their likely sensitivity to climate change (changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.


      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:
      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

    • Land/soils sensitive to climate change

      Description:

      This layer broadly depicts the areas of land/soils assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for their likely sensitivity to climate change (changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period) under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.

      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:
      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

    • Coasts sensitive to climate change

      This layer depicts the sections of coasts assigned a ‘very high’ or ‘catastrophic’ rating for their likely sensitivity to changes in annual rainfall and/or changes to maximum temperatures over the spring and summer period under the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 4.5 scenario.

      RCP 4.5 is considered to be a moderate scenario of future carbon emissions. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, it is predicted that annual average rainfall could reduce by 16-34mm below the 1986-2005 average and maximum summer temperature could increase by 2-2.9 degrees above the 1986-2005 average.  However, actual future changes could be smaller or larger depending on the actual effects of rising atmospheric CO2 and the success of global CO2 mitigation.

      Source:

      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the ‘Impact and Vulnerability Assessment Process and Spatial Outputs’ Final Project Report 1 produced for Victorian Catchment Management Authorities by Spatial Vision.  The report is available in the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website.

      Further information regarding risk of inundation and flooding in coastal areas is available via the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website (go to the link for the Port Phillip Bay Coastal Adaptation Pathways project or Westernport Local Coastal Hazard Assessment).

    • Relative carbon sequestration potential

      Description:

      This layer broadly depicts areas of the region potentially suitable for revegetation at a scale that would be significant for carbon sequestration purposes (including consideration of current land use, original vegetation type, rainfall, soil type and current vegetation quality).  It generally excludes areas of public land, intensive agriculture and urban areas.

      The layer shows:


      Source:

      This layer has been derived from the mapping associated with the Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning BioSim Carbon Sequestration assessment.

    • Overview

      The main environmental assets in the Moorabool, Melton, Wyndham and Greater Geelong area identified as sensitive to significant future climate change are:

      • Large areas of native vegetation in the Brisbane Ranges National Park and the You Yangs, Werribee Gorge and Lerderderg Regional and State Parks.  Also in the north-south corridor from Lerderderg State Park to Long Forest Fauna and Flora Reserve.
      • The upper reaches of the Werribee River and its tributaries south of the Great Divide to Bacchus Marsh and Melton. 
      • Numerous freshwater wetlands, particularly across the volcanic plains and coastal wetlands at Point Cook. 
      • Soils across the north-western third of the region, particularly west of the Rowsley Fault where soils occur on steeper slopes and where increased wind and water erosion risk is created under climate-induced vegetation loss and more frequent intense fire.  Soils on the coast near Little River may be made sensitive to saltwater flooding by rising sea levels.

      Priorities for carbon plantings

      Large-scale plantings of new vegetation to sequester carbon will be best placed where they can also achieve biodiversity benefits in the local landscapes including increased connectedness of native habitat. 

      There is HIGH priority for plantings that contribute to the development of:

      • the Brisbane Ranges to Lerderderg State Park Nature Link;
      • the Brisbane Ranges to You Yangs Nature Link; and
      • the Werribee River Nature Link.

      In addition, the coastal vegetation and soils on the western shoreline of Port Phillip Bay are considered to hold significant stores of carbon.  It is therefore a VERY HIGH priority to protect these ‘blue carbon’ stores through activities such as fencing, management of pests and overuse to ensure vegetation extent and quality are maintained, and revegetation in the Port Phillip Bay Western Shoreline Nature Link.

      The rationale for these priorities is outlined in the following document available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.

      Adapting to the changing climate

      To contribute to the future health and the resilience of natural assets and ecosystems under changing climate, land and water management organisations, community groups and landholders should also consider a range of actions to adapt to a changing climate such as:

      • Maintain and preferably improve the extent and quality of existing native vegetation.  Revegetation should continue with local provenance species but there may be future evidence to support including species that may be more tolerant of a warmer, dryer climate.
      • Improve and protect waterway corridors and wetlands as refuges for native flora and fauna in times of climate-related stress.  This may include fencing these areas off, revegetation, seeking to maintain environmentally-important water levels and connecting them to other patches of habitat via vegetation links.
      • Maintain ground cover on rural land, especially during periods of drought.
      • Contribute to collective action and learning by supporting Landcare and other community or rural industry-based organisations.  Support citizen science about climate change effects with activities such as monitoring changes to vegetation extent, quality, flowering, seed-set and recruitment.

      More information

      The following documents are also available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website to provide more information on potential future climate changes and impacts in the Port Phillip and Western Port region:

      • PPWCMA summary of climate change predictions for the Port Phillip and Western Port region
      • Southern slopes cluster report; Climate change in Australia – projections for NRM regions.
      • The Distribution and Abundance of 'Blue Carbon' within Port Phillip and Westernport, A Report for the Port Phillip & Westernport CMA. 2015.

    • Overview

      The main environmental assets in the Macedon Ranges, Hume, Mitchell and Whittlesea area identified as sensitive to significant future climate change are:

      • Large areas of native vegetation in Macedon and along the Great Divide north of Cobaw, Lancefield and Whittlesea. Also in the valleys of the upper Deep Creek and Merri Creek and in conservation reserves at Woodlands and Jacksons Creek.
      • Upper reaches of Deep Creek and Moonee Ponds Creek.
      • Numerous freshwater wetlands, particularly at Kalkallo and Wallan.
      • Soils on steeper slopes along the Divide around Macedon and south through Gisborne to Toolern Vale. Also in the Deep Creek catchment and on the hills north and east of Whittlesea where erosion risk is increased by climate-induced vegetation loss and more frequent intense fire. 

      Priorities for carbon plantings

      Large-scale plantings of new vegetation to sequester carbon will be best placed where they can also achieve biodiversity benefits in the local landscapes including increased connectedness of native habitat.
      There is a VERY HIGH priority for plantings that contribute to the development of the ‘Nature Links’ in this area, namely:

      • Cobaw Range to Mt Disappointment Nature Link; 
      • Cobaw Range to Macedon Ranges Nature Link;
      • Merri Creek Nature Link; and
      • Maribyrnong River Nature Link.

      The rationale for these priorities is outlined in the following document available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.

      Adapting to the changing climate

      To contribute to the future health and the resilience of natural assets and ecosystems under changing climate, land and water management organisations, community groups and landholders should also consider a range of actions to adapt to a changing climate such as:

      • Maintain and preferably improve the extent and quality of existing native vegetation. Revegetation should continue with local provenance species but there may be future evidence to support including species that may be more tolerant of a warmer, dryer climate.
      • Improve and protect waterway corridors and wetlands as refuges for native flora and fauna in times of climate-related stress. This may include fencing these areas off, revegetation, seeking to maintain environmentally-important water levels and connecting them to other patches of habitat via vegetation links. 
      • Maintain ground cover on rural land, especially during periods of drought.
      • Contribute to collective action and learning by supporting Landcare and other community or rural industry-based organisations. Support citizen science about climate change effects with activities such as monitoring changes to vegetation extent, quality, flowering, seed-set and recruitment.

      More information

      The following documents are also available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website to provide more information on potential future climate changes and impacts in the Port Phillip and Western Port region:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      • Southern slopes cluster report; Climate change in Australia – projections for NRM regions.

    • Overview

      The main environmental assets in the Yarra Ranges and Nillumbik area identified as sensitive to significant future climate change are:

      • Large areas of native vegetation across the upper and middle catchments and tributaries of the Yarra River and the upper Bunyip and Tarago River catchments. Also, in the Dandenong Ranges between Silvan and Emerald.
      • The upper reaches of the Yarra, Tarago and Bunyip Rivers.
      • Soils across the majority of the Yarra Ranges and Nillumbik region, specifically on steeper slopes where increased wind and water erosion risk is created under climate-induced vegetation loss and more frequent intense fire. 

      Priorities for carbon plantings

      Large-scale plantings of new vegetation to sequester carbon will be best placed where they can also achieve biodiversity benefits in the local landscapes including increased connectedness of native habitat.
      There is VERY HIGH priority for plantings that contribute to the development of the Yellingbo and Warrandyte to Kinglake Nature Links.
      The rationale for this priority is outlined in the following document available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.

      Adapting to the changing climate

      To contribute to the future health and the resilience of natural assets and ecosystems under changing climate, land and water management organisations, community groups and landholders should consider actions to:

      • Maintain and preferably improve the extent and quality of existing native vegetation. Revegetation should continue with local provenance species but there may be future evidence to support including species that may be more tolerant of a warmer, dryer climate.
      • Improve and protect waterway corridors and wetlands as refuges for native flora and fauna in times of climate-related stress. This may include fencing these areas off, revegetation, seeking to maintain environmentally-important water levels and connecting them to other patches of habitat via vegetation links. 
      • Maintain ground cover on rural land, especially during periods of drought.
      • Contribute to collective action and learning by supporting Landcare and other community or rural industry-based organisations. Support citizen science about climate change effects with activities such as monitoring changes to vegetation extent, quality, flowering, seed-set and recruitment.

      More information

      The following documents are also available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website to provide more information on potential future climate changes and impacts in the Port Phillip and Western Port region:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      • Southern slopes cluster report; Climate change in Australia – projections for NRM regions.

    • Overview

      The main environmental assets in the Urban Melbourne area identified as sensitive to significant future climate change are:

      • Native vegetation in the Yarra River and Maribyrnong River corridors.
      • Coastal wetlands at Laverton and Altona.
      •  Ramsar freshwater wetlands between Edithvale and Seaford.
      • Soils between Mordialloc and Frankston that are sensitive to rising sea levels and saltwater intrusion.

      Priorities for carbon plantings

      Large-scale plantings of new vegetation to sequester carbon will be best placed where they can also achieve biodiversity benefits in the local landscapes including increased connectedness of native habitat.

      There is HIGH priority for plantings that contribute to the development of three ‘Nature Links’ in this area, namely:

      • Kororoit Creek Nature Link;
      • Dandenong Ranges to Port Phillip Bay Nature Link; and
      • Yarra River Nature Link.

      In addition, the coastal vegetation and soils of Port Phillip Bay are considered to hold significant stores of blue carbon. It is therefore a VERY HIGH priority to protect these ‘blue carbon’ stores through activities such as fencing and management of pests and overuse to ensure vegetation extent and quality are maintained.

      The rationale for these priorities is outlined in the following document available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      Adapting to the changing climate
      To contribute to the future health and the resilience of natural assets and ecosystems under changing climate, land and water management organisations, community groups and landholders should consider actions to:
      • Maintain and preferably improve the extent and quality of existing native vegetation. Revegetation should continue with local provenance species but there may be future evidence to support including species that may be more tolerant of a warmer, dryer climate.
      • Improve and protect waterway corridors and wetlands as refuges for native flora and fauna in times of climate-related stress. This may include fencing these areas off, revegetation, seeking to maintain environmentally-important water levels and connecting them to other patches of habitat via vegetation links.
      • Maintain ground cover on rural land, especially during periods of drought.
      • Contribute to collective action and learning by supporting Landcare and other community or rural industry-based organisations.  Support citizen science about climate change effects with activities such as monitoring changes to vegetation extent, quality, flowering, seed-set and recruitment.

      More information

      The following documents are also available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website to provide more information on potential future climate changes and impacts in the Port Phillip and Western Port region:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      • Southern slopes cluster report; Climate change in Australia – projections for NRM regions.
      • The Distribution and Abundance of 'Blue Carbon' within Port Phillip and Westernport, A Report for the Port Phillip & Westernport CMA, 2015.

    • Overview

      The main environmental assets in the Casey, Cardinia and Baw Baw area identified as sensitive to significant future climate change are:

      • Large areas of native vegetation between Beaconsfield and Drouin, including the Bunyip State Park and north and south of Drouin.
      • Small areas of native coastal vegetation between Quail Island and Tooradin.
      • Cardinia Creek in the Beaconsfield area.
      • Coastal wetlands across northern Western Port from Yaringa to Yallock Creek.
      • Soils between Narre Warren and Pakenham.

      Priorities for carbon plantings

      Large-scale plantings of new vegetation to sequester carbon will be best placed where they can also achieve biodiversity benefits in the local landscapes including increased connectedness of native habitat.
      There is VERY HIGH priority for plantings that contribute to the development of the Upper Bunyip Nature Link.

      In addition, the coastal vegetation and soils of Western Port Bay are considered to hold significant stores of blue carbon. It is therefore a VERY HIGH priority to protect these ‘blue carbon’ stores through activities such as fencing, management of pests and overuse to ensure vegetation extent and quality are maintained, and revegetation in the Western Port Coast Nature Link.

      The rationale for these priorities is outlined in the following document available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.

      Adapting to the changing climate

      To contribute to the future health and the resilience of natural assets and ecosystems under changing climate, land and water management organisations, community groups and landholders should consider actions to:

      • Maintain and preferably improve the extent and quality of existing native vegetation. Revegetation should continue with local provenance species but there may be future evidence to support including species that may be more tolerant of a warmer, dryer climate.
      • Improve and protect waterway corridors and wetlands as refuges for native flora and fauna in times of climate-related stress. This may include fencing these areas off, revegetation, seeking to maintain environmentally-important water levels and connecting them to other patches of habitat via vegetation links.
      • Maintain ground cover on rural land, especially during periods of drought.
      • Contribute to collective action and learning by supporting Landcare and other community or rural industry-based organisations.  Support citizen science about climate change effects with activities such as monitoring changes to vegetation extent, quality, flowering, seed-set and recruitment.

      More information

      The following documents are also available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website to provide more information on potential future climate changes and impacts in the Port Phillip and Western Port region:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      • Southern slopes cluster report; Climate change in Australia – projections for NRM regions.
      • The Distribution and Abundance of 'Blue Carbon' within Port Phillip and Westernport, A Report for the Port Phillip & Westernport CMA, 2015.
       

    • Overview

      The main environmental assets on the Mornington Peninsula identified as being sensitive to significant future climate change are:

      • Large areas of native vegetation at Tootgarook Swamp, HMAS Cerberus, and the Mornington Peninsula and Point Nepean National Parks.  Also, on public and private land scattered across the Peninsula.
      • Low-lying wetland at Tootgarook Swamp.
      • Soils around Arthurs Seat, between Hastings, Sandy Point and Balnarring on steep slopes and/or prone to increased wind and water erosion under climate-induced vegetation loss and more frequent intense fire. 

      Priorities for carbon plantings

      Large-scale plantings of new vegetation to sequester carbon will be best placed where they can also achieve biodiversity benefits in the local landscapes including increased connectedness of native habitat.

      There is VERY HIGH priority for plantings that contribute to the development of the Mornington Peninsula Nature Link and the Mornington Peninsula National Park to Cerberus Nature Link in this area.

      In addition, the coastal vegetation and soils of Port Phillip and Western Port Bays are considered to hold significant stores of blue carbon. It is therefore a VERY HIGH priority to protect these ‘blue carbon’ stores through activities such as fencing and management of pests and overuse to ensure vegetation extent and quality are maintained.

      The rationale for these priorities is outlined in the following document available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      Adapting to the changing climate
      To contribute to the future health and the resilience of natural assets and ecosystems under changing climate, land and water management organisations, community groups and landholders should consider actions to:
      • Maintain and preferably improve the extent and quality of existing native vegetation. Revegetation should continue with local provenance species but there may be future evidence to support including species that may be more tolerant of a warmer, dryer climate.
      • Improve and protect waterway corridors and wetlands as refuges for native flora and fauna in times of climate-related stress. This may include fencing these areas off, revegetation, seeking to maintain environmentally-important water levels and connecting them to other patches of habitat via vegetation links.
      • Maintain ground cover on rural land, especially during periods of drought.
      • Contribute to collective action and learning by supporting Landcare and other community or rural industry-based organisations.  Support citizen science about climate change effects with activities such as monitoring changes to vegetation extent, quality, flowering, seed-set and recruitment.

      More information

      The following documents are also available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website to provide more information on potential future climate changes and impacts in the Port Phillip and Western Port region:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      • Southern slopes cluster report; Climate change in Australia – projections for NRM regions.
      • The Distribution and Abundance of 'Blue Carbon' within Port Phillip and Westernport, A Report for the Port Phillip & Westernport CMA, 2015.

    • Overview

      The main environmental assets in the South Gippsland, Bass Coast & Islands area identified as sensitive to significant future climate change are:

      • Areas of native vegetation north and south of Loch, The Gurdies, Grantville and Glen Forbes.
      • Coastal native vegetation on Phillip Island at Cape Woolamai, The Nobbies, Summerlands, Churchill Island and French Island.
      • The upper reaches of the Bass and Lang Lang Rivers.
      • Coastal wetlands on French Island and Rhyll.
      • Coastal soils on Phillip Island from Smith Beach to Woolamai, around Cowes and south of Ventnor

      Priorities for carbon plantings

      Large-scale plantings of new vegetation to sequester carbon will be best placed where they can also achieve biodiversity benefits in the local landscapes including increased connectedness of native habitat.

      There is VERY HIGH priority for plantings that contribute to the development of the Western Port to Mount Worth Nature Link.

      In addition, the coastal vegetation and soils of Western Port Bay are considered to hold significant stores of blue carbon. It is therefore a VERY HIGH priority to protect these ‘blue carbon’ stores through activities such as fencing, management of pests and overuse to ensure vegetation extent and quality are maintained, and revegetation for the Western Port Coast Nature Link.

      The rationale for these priorities is outlined in the following document available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.

      Adapting to the changing climate

      To contribute to the future health and the resilience of natural assets and ecosystems under changing climate, land and water management organisations, community groups and landholders should consider actions to:

      • Maintain and preferably improve the extent and quality of existing native vegetation. Revegetation should continue with local provenance species but there may be future evidence to support including species that may be more tolerant of a warmer, dryer climate.
      • Improve and protect waterway corridors and wetlands as refuges for native flora and fauna in times of climate-related stress. This may include fencing these areas off, revegetation, seeking to maintain environmentally-important water levels and connecting them to other patches of habitat via vegetation links.
      • Maintain ground cover on rural land, especially during periods of drought.
      • Contribute to collective action and learning by supporting Landcare and other community or rural industry-based organisations.  Support citizen science about climate change effects with activities such as monitoring changes to vegetation extent, quality, flowering, seed-set and recruitment.

      More information

      The following documents are also available at the Downloads section of this Regional Catchment Strategy website to provide more information on potential future climate changes and impacts in the Port Phillip and Western Port region:

      • PPWCMA identification of priorities for carbon plantings and protection of carbon stores in the Port Phillip and Western Port region.
      • Southern slopes cluster report; Climate change in Australia – projections for NRM regions.
      • The Distribution and Abundance of 'Blue Carbon' within Port Phillip and Westernport, A Report for the Port Phillip & Westernport CMA, 2015.

  • + Other information

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    Each layer holds data - click directly on a shape/line/point on the map to see the data.

    Lastest update: 24-03-2017

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